Author Archives: whansa

Reflection

This semester was definitely a unique experience since all of our essays were posted online not only for the teacher but for all of our classmates to see. Whenever I went into a writing assignment I always thought it was important to keep that in mind. I tried to stay as true to myself as possible and in a weird way I was kind of anxious to see what my other classmates had to think of my writing. Sometimes it was positive feedback and other times it was constructive criticism. I always used this feedback whether it was from my classmates or my teacher to help better my writing. Being able to rewrite my work was definitely a big help in creating a successful paper. Sometimes just by rewriting my own work I was able to get an easier grasp on a prompt or just have an easier flow of ideas to help strengthen what I had to say. Also by being a member of an online writing community I was not only able to retrieve help from others but I was able to help others out as well. I was actually very impressed with what most people were putting up. Many times I would read posts and think to myself- how on earth am I going to be able to top this? Reading others posts also came with the benefit of seeing how others approached an assignment. Many times if I found myself stuck and unsure of where to begin so I would read posts that my classmates may have put up early to help give me a grasp on where to begin. I think a big piece of advice I learned from the instructor was to integrate quotes and source material in my writing. For instance in my first draft of article 1 I had no quotes but when I turned in my final version I made it a point to use them. For example, I wrote in Article 1 “When it comes to activism Malcolm Gladwell argues in his article “Small Change’’ that social media is nothing but a tool for people to take the easy way out. “In other words, “Facebook activism succeeds not by motivating people to make a real sacrifice but by motivating them to do the things that people do when they are not motivated enough to make a real sacrifice.” Integrating quotes such as this and other source materials has really helped develop my writing. Outside of the classroom I believe I will continue to develop as a writer. I know that in the business world writing is an essential tool that expands beyond the realms of English class. 

Overall I have always felt I had been a pretty good writer throughout my education and I think English 104 has really helped polish my skills. Whenever I was given a prompt I always tried to use my previous developed skills and think outside the box to create a unique piece of writing. One encounter that comes to mind was when we had to reinvent a previous post into something different. I decided to reinvent one of my encounters into a poem and it turned out to be pretty successful. It was cool to think outside of the box and do something different then write just a regular essay. I received positive feedback from both the instructor and my other classmates. Who knew that I would ever call myself a poet? I think one area of writing that I have definitely improved upon is the integration of quotes and sources. I am much more confident in integrating other text in my writing and I believe it is actually one of my strengths.  I believe this is a very important skill to develop because it helps give a true analysis of what other writers have to say. It also helps give me the ability to make a point whether I disagree or agree with their writing. For example in article 2 I wrote “Wilson’s argument is that “religion and science are the two most powerful forces in the world today, and especially in the United States. If religion and science could be united on the common ground of biological conservation, the problem might soon be solved.” In my opinion Wilson does an effective job in creating a rogerian argument by establishing common ground between science and religion.” This is just one of many examples of a skill that I used in my papers. Hopefully in time I will continue to improve upon this skill and battle through my struggles to become a better writer. I think writing is a very important skill to have even outside English class. I’m an accounting major and I know I will have much more writing ahead of me whether it’s a resume, another project, ect. Hopefully my writing skills will continue to develop and expand from here on out and I will be able to utilize the many skills I have retained from being a successful English 104 student. I believe my writing career is far from over and I believe the future looks bright from here on out.


Artifact 2: Self Defined

When it comes to activism Malcolm Gladwell argues in his article “Small Change’’ that social media is nothing but a tool for people to take the easy way out. “In other words, Facebook activism succeeds not by motivating people to make a real sacrifice but by motivating them to do the things that people do when they are not motivated enough to make a real sacrifice.” He asserts that in order to achieve change activism needs to have strong ties, high risk, and a hierarchy within the movement.  I would agree that all of these things are indeed vital to achieve change, but these characteristics are all derived from the mutual efforts of many brave people. What Gladwell neglects to acknowledge is that all mutual effort in any circumstance, is derived from self.  Self is what sparks activism and without a spark your left with no fire.

            Whether it’s violence, drugs, or other addictions I think it’s very easy for people to stray away from who they truly are.  However, when people believe in a higher calling worth laying down their life, they will definitely go further then just like a page on Facebook. Higher callings come from within and no social media site can deter you away from a feeling so deep and close to your true self. In fact, I believe social media is capable of achieving just the opposite; I believe social media is capable of lighting the spark within our true self.

            In today’s age social media has played a critical role in uniting ourselves as people, but it hasn’t defined us as individuals. Your Facebook or Twitter page holds no weight on the actions that defines you as a person. Instead, each of your actions and or opinions you make generate from one thing and one thing only, self. How you live your life, despite the many outside influences, is a direct reflection of self. Self to me is a person’s unique being that differentiates themselves from one person to the next. This “unique being” is what gives a person the strength and ability to overcome and fight for what they hold most dear and close within.

            Our strengths, our weaknesses, our fears, our motivation, all originate from self. It is the fuel to any action we as a people have ever taken or will ever take. Self is personal to each and every individual; it distincts one person from the next. It is the reason so many brave people laid down their lives for a cause greater then themselves and its is the reason why so many brave people continue to do that very same thing.

            So is it really logical to think that people would have liked a page that boycotted busses but continued to ride them?  That instead of marching the streets of Birmingham they would have just tweeted? Galdwell writes “Enthusiasts for social media would no doubt have us believe that King’s task in Birmingham would have been made infinitely easier had he been able to communicate with his followers through Facebook, and contented himself with tweets from a Birmingham jail. But networks are messy…The things that King needed in Birmingham—discipline and strategy—were things that online social media cannot provide.”

            In my opinion, social media is more than capable of providing the discipline and strategy the Civil Rights Movements needed. I also believe that just because people would have been using Facebook Twitter ect., that they would have no longer met in secret, and continued to plan and organize the movement in person. This movement was too personal to each and every individual’s self for social media to be “motivating them to do the things that people do when they are not motivated enough to make a real sacrifice.” These people were able to lay down the biggest sacrifice of all- their lives.

            In conclusion I firmly believe that self is what sparks activism. That’s not to say that Gladwell doesn’t make good points in achieving successful activism but I believe he fails to understand the real role social media plays. Sure Facebook and other cites may be a network of “weak ties” as Gladwell asserts, but in my opinion when people want change that is held so close and important to their true self, people will be motivated to go beyond the realms and constraints of social media. Social media can help light the spark within our true selves, and sometimes one spark is all it takes to lead to the fiery revolution of many.


Artifact1: Alliance of the Times

The article “Apocalypse Now” written by Harvard biologist Edward O. Wilson is an entreaty for Christian environmentalism.  In the article, Wilson is writing to an imaginary Baptist pastor in a plea for an alliance between religion and science. He asserts that although science and religion differ in many ways, they both share the ultimate goal of human welfare. Wilson contends that in order to achieve this goal religion and science must unite in an effort to save the earth’s biosphere. Wilson’s argument is that “religion and science are the two most powerful forces in the world today, and especially in the United States. If religion and science could be united on the common ground of biological conservation, the problem might soon be solved.” In my opinion Wilson does an effective job in creating a rogerian argument by establishing common ground between science and religion.

            A major problem conservationists are confronted with today is the rising destruction of habitual environments. Wilson claims, “If this rise continues unabated, the cost to humanity—in wealth, environmental security, and quality of life—will be catastrophic.” In turn, Wilson asserts if current rates of destruction persist, nearly half of all earth’s species may become extinct by the end of the current century. He also goes on to contend that destruction of the earth’s environment today will not come without a cost for future generations to come. Not only are we destroying our own resources but tomorrow’s resources as well. “Gone forever will be undiscovered medicines, crops, timber, fibers, soil-restoring vegetation, petroleum substitutes, and other products and amenities.” In short, Wilson is reminding us that the human race ultimately relies upon the protection of the earth’s biosphere. Without a healthy and stable environment the human race would surely not exist. Here, Wilson is establishing a universal concern for both science and religion; another reason why I believe Wilson’s is creating a very effective rogerian argument.

            In order to achieve the overall goal of uniting religion and science, Wilson contends that although there are obvious differences in their origin of creation, saving the creation is at the heart of both forces. Wilson claims that environmentalists today do not have enough political power to save our creation. He goes on to say  “An alliance between science and religion, forged in an atmosphere of mutual respect, may be the only way to protect life on earth, including, in the end, our own.” In this instance, Wilson is trying to make us understand the potential of such unification. An alliance between science and religion is not only important but absolutely vital to saving the creation. This is why Wilson asserts differences in worldview should not setback a movement that is held central to both the scientific and religious community. “The defense of living nature is a universal value. It doesn’t rise from, nor does it promote, any religious or ideological dogma. Rather, it serves without discrimination the interests of all humanity.” Again, Wilson is creating common ground, this is essential to getting his argument across to the pastor and religious community.

            Although it may sound dubious for religion and science to ever unite, Wilson claims many efforts are actually being set forth to make this happen. According to Wilson, organizations such as the “Green Cross” and the “Evangelical Environmental Network” are expanding their efforts each and every day. Even religious leaders such as Bartholomew I, Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Church are speaking out on its importance. Wilson quotes Bartholomew I, “For humans to cause species to become extinct and to destroy the biological diversity of God’s creation … these are sins.” Wilson then affirms the pastor that he feels many religious leaders are doing a great job in their support for environmentalism; however, there still is a long way to go and much work to be done. Again this is an intelligent approach by Wilson because he is showing the pastor that science has already gained the support of many religious leaders; therefore, a unification between science and religion may not be so far fetch after all. 

            In relation to Malcolm Gladwell’s article “Small Change” I believe in order for Wilson’s environmental movement to be successful, it’s important for Wilson to take into consideration some of Gladwell’s steps in achieving successful activism. Gladwell asserts that in order to achieve change, activism needs to have a hierarchy within the movement and strong ties. If both scientific and religious leaders could figure out a way of organizing and distributing power fairly throughout the movement, the movement would become much more effective.  Also, by creating strong ties with the overall goal of human welfare in mind, science and religion would be able to overcome their differences and unite much easier. In turn, these steps would only enhance Wilson’s aim in creating common ground.

            In conclusion, the promotion of Wilson’s idea to unite religion and science in an effort to save the environment may have extraordinary potential. The biosphere is in dire need of help and Wilson does an effective job of reminding us without intervention the consequences could prove catastrophic for future generations to come. Although many may think an alliance between science and religion is far fetch, Wilson does a good job of disregarding such a stereotype by creating common ground between both religion and science. This is a very strategic and intelligent approach by Wilson, which is why I believe he does an effective job in creating his argument for a union between two very opposite parties.


Manson Media

         Over the past four decades Charles Manson has become one of the most famous convicts in American History. In the 1960’s Manson led a cult known as the Manson Family, a group of followers who performed various murders on Manson’s command. Manson in time identified himself with a Beatles’ song named ‘‘Helter Skelter’’. He believed the lyrics construed an apocalyptic race war that he presumed his murders were intended to trigger. Manson and some of his followers were later arrested in 1969 where they were charged and eventually found guilty of several accounts of murder and conspiracy in 1971.  (Charles Manson and the Family)

During the time of the trial Charles Manson and his ‘‘family’’ gained great attention from the American Media.  Accordingly, Manson soon became a household name among many Americans.  All the while, in the midst of the Vietnam War, the American Media began playing a much more intense role in unraveling the news. The Watergate scandal would later prove to be a perfect example.  On the contrary, although the Manson Family murders appeared to focus solely on Charles Manson and his case at hand, it actually reveals the beginning of a time period where the American Media operated as a significant power in the eyes of the American public. 

One of the most famous pictures of Manson is a picture of Manson on the cover of Life Magazine. The photo was displayed on the cover of the December issue in 1969 and is titled ‘‘The Love and Terror Cult’’.  (Charlie Manson and The Family- Pictures of the Manson Family) The picture is a close up of Manson’s face during the time he was first convicted. His hair is long and messy and he looks as if he hasn’t shaved or showered in weeks. By his lack of hygiene one can infer he doesn’t exactly fit within the norms of regular American society.

Subsequently, after this picture appeared on the cover of Life Magazine Charles Manson and his family started to gain much attention from the American public. The Manson Family murders were seen as very unusual to Americans and consequently they gained much attention. As ‘‘The love and Terror Cult’’ began to captivate many Americans, the American media was beginning to mark its place as a dominant social power amongst the American public.

With various shows such as ‘‘CSI’’, ‘‘Law and Order’’, etcetera, it seems obvious that many Americans have some sort of fascination with criminal investigations. The Manson Family was such complicated and unusual story it probably enthused many Americans’ interest in the trial. In spite of the Vietnam War, at the time, many Americans were already occupied with the media. The Vietnam War first began in November of 1955 and several years later, as the war persisted, many American were becoming increasingly fed up (United States American History). Kids fresh out high school were being drafted and sent away to fight a war many Americans believed we had no business fighting in the first place.   Soldiers as young as 18 were dying on the battlefield and many parents had to burry their own kids.  Perhaps the Manson Family was a way for people to escape all the chaos imposed by Vietnam. The media was now beginning to shape the news around American culture, and as a result it became an outlet for many Americans in a time of crisis.

In conclusion, the American media plays a vital role in shaping and grasping our opinions on the world. The media has gained power by intensifying its role in unraveling the news and by shaping the news around American values and culture. Over the past 40 years the American media has learned to adapt to the wants and needs of the American public and as a result the media has become an outlet for Americans and their everyday issues with our country and the world.

 


Article 1 Self Defined: Rewrite

When it comes to activism Malcolm Gladwell argues in his article “Small Change’’ that social media is nothing but a tool for people to take the easy way out. “In other words, Facebook activism succeeds not by motivating people to make a real sacrifice but by motivating them to do the things that people do when they are not motivated enough to make a real sacrifice.” He asserts that in order to achieve change activism needs to have strong ties, high risk, and a hierarchy within the movement. I would agree that all of these things are indeed vital to achieve change, but these characteristics are all derived from the mutual efforts of many brave people. What Gladwell neglects to acknowledge is that all mutual effort in any circumstance, is derived from self. Self is what sparks activism and without a spark your left with no fire.
Whether it’s violence, drugs, or other addictions I think it’s very easy for people to stray away from who they truly are. However, when people believe in a higher calling worth laying down their life, they will definitely go further then just like a page on Facebook. Higher callings come from within and no social media site can deter you away from a feeling so deep and close to your true self. In fact, I believe social media is capable of achieving just the opposite; I believe social media is capable of lighting the spark within our true self.
In today’s age social media has played a critical role in uniting ourselves as people, but it hasn’t defined us as individuals. Your Facebook or Twitter page holds no weight on the actions that defines you as a person. Instead, each of your actions and or opinions you make generate from one thing and one thing only, self. How you live your life, despite the many outside influences, is a direct reflection of self. Self to me is a person’s unique being that differentiates themselves from one person to the next. This “unique being” is what gives a person the strength and ability to overcome and fight for what they hold most dear and close within.
Our strengths, our weaknesses, our fears, our motivation, all originate from self. It is the fuel to any action we as a people have ever taken or will ever take. Self is personal to each and every individual; it distincts one person from the next. It is the reason so many brave people laid down their lives for a cause greater then themselves and its is the reason why so many brave people continue to do that very same thing.
So is it really logical to think that people would have liked a page that boycotted busses but continued to ride them? That instead of marching the streets of Birmingham they would have just tweeted? Galdwell writes “Enthusiasts for social media would no doubt have us believe that King’s task in Birmingham would have been made infinitely easier had he been able to communicate with his followers through Facebook, and contented himself with tweets from a Birmingham jail. But networks are messy…The things that King needed in Birmingham—discipline and strategy—were things that online social media cannot provide.”
In my opinion, social media is more than capable of providing the discipline and strategy the Civil Rights Movements needed. I also believe that just because people would have been using Facebook Twitter ect., that they would have no longer met in secret, and continued to plan and organize the movement in person. This movement was too personal to each and every individual’s self for social media to be “motivating them to do the things that people do when they are not motivated enough to make a real sacrifice.” These people were able to lay down the biggest sacrifice of all- their lives.
In conclusion I firmly believe that self is what sparks activism. That’s not to say that Gladwell doesn’t make good points in achieving successful activism but I believe he fails to understand the real role social media plays. Sure Facebook and other cites may be a network of “weak ties” as Gladwell asserts, but in my opinion when people want change that is held so close and important to their true self, people will be motivated to go beyond the realms and constraints of social media. Social media can help light the spark within our true selves, and sometimes one spark is all it takes to lead to the fiery revolution of many.


Alliance of the Times- Article 2

The article “Apocalypse Now” written by Harvard biologist Edward O. Wilson is an entreaty for Christian environmentalism.  In the article, Wilson is writing to an imaginary Baptist pastor in a plea for an alliance between religion and science. He asserts that although science and religion differ in many ways, they both share the ultimate goal of human welfare. Wilson contends that in order to achieve this goal religion and science must unite in an effort to save the earth’s biosphere. Wilson’s argument is that “religion and science are the two most powerful forces in the world today, and especially in the United States. If religion and science could be united on the common ground of biological conservation, the problem might soon be solved.” In my opinion Wilson does an effective job in creating a rogerian argument by establishing common ground between science and religion.

A major problem conservationists are confronted with today is the rising destruction of habitual environments. Wilson claims, “If this rise continues unabated, the cost to humanity—in wealth, environmental security, and quality of life—will be catastrophic.” In turn, Wilson asserts if current rates of destruction persist, nearly half of all earth’s species may become extinct by the end of the current century. He also goes on to contend that destruction of the earth’s environment today will not come without a cost for future generations to come. Not only are we destroying our own resources but tomorrow’s resources as well. “Gone forever will be undiscovered medicines, crops, timber, fibers, soil-restoring vegetation, petroleum substitutes, and other products and amenities.” In short, Wilson is reminding us that the human race ultimately relies upon the protection of the earth’s biosphere. Without a healthy and stable environment the human race would surely not exist. Here, Wilson is establishing a universal concern for both science and religion; another reason why I believe Wilson’s is creating a very effective rogerian argument.

In order to achieve the overall goal of uniting religion and science, Wilson contends that although there are obvious differences in their origin of creation, saving the creation is at the heart of both forces. Wilson claims that environmentalists today do not have enough political power to save our creation. He goes on to say  “An alliance between science and religion, forged in an atmosphere of mutual respect, may be the only way to protect life on earth, including, in the end, our own.” In this instance, Wilson is trying to make us understand the potential of such unification. An alliance between science and religion is not only important but absolutely vital to saving the creation. This is why Wilson asserts differences in worldview should not setback a movement that is held central to both the scientific and religious community. “The defense of living nature is a universal value. It doesn’t rise from, nor does it promote, any religious or ideological dogma. Rather, it serves without discrimination the interests of all humanity.” Again, Wilson is creating common ground, this is essential to getting his argument across to the pastor and religious community.

Although it may sound dubious for religion and science to ever unite, Wilson claims many efforts are actually being set forth to make this happen. According to Wilson, organizations such as the “Green Cross” and the “Evangelical Environmental Network” are expanding their efforts each and every day. Even religious leaders such as Bartholomew I, Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Church are speaking out on its importance. Wilson quotes Bartholomew I, “For humans to cause species to become extinct and to destroy the biological diversity of God’s creation … these are sins.” Wilson then affirms the pastor that he feels many religious leaders are doing a great job in their support for environmentalism; however, there still is a long way to go and much work to be done. Again this is an intelligent approach by Wilson because he is showing the pastor that science has already gained the support of many religious leaders; therefore, a unification between science and religion may not be so far fetch after all.

In relation to Malcolm Gladwell’s article “Small Change” I believe in order for Wilson’s environmental movement to be successful, it’s important for Wilson to take into consideration some of Gladwell’s steps in achieving successful activism. Gladwell asserts that in order to achieve change, activism needs to have a hierarchy within the movement and strong ties. If both scientific and religious leaders could figure out a way of organizing and distributing power fairly throughout the movement, the movement would become much more effective.  Also, by creating strong ties with the overall goal of human welfare in mind, science and religion would be able to overcome their differences and unite much easier. In turn, these steps would only enhance Wilson’s aim in creating common ground.

In conclusion, the promotion of Wilson’s idea to unite religion and science in an effort to save the environment may have extraordinary potential. The biosphere is in dire need of help and Wilson does an effective job of reminding us without intervention the consequences could prove catastrophic for future generations to come. Although many may think an alliance between science and religion is far fetch, Wilson does a good job of disregarding such a stereotype by creating common ground between both religion and science. This is a very strategic and intelligent approach by Wilson, which is why I believe he does an effective job in creating his argument for a union between two very opposite parties.


Unfamiliar Rabbit Holes

Falling down rabbit holes

Don’t know where to begin

Looking here and looking there

Procrastination kicks in

 

I need to find a purpose

But I just can’t find the way

So I scroll down the page some more

And click on the link “PLAY”

 

I’m taken to a game

It’s loading very slow

Staring at the page

Should I stay or should I go?

 

The game begins

And here I am staring at the screen

There’s a tiny man with brown hair

What does this even mean?

 

Each click brings different colors

Each click brings many things

No rules and no purpose

A game with small meaning

 

Even though it’s weird

And not much point indeed

In the end falling down unfamiliar rabbit holes

May just be what we need

 

-Twisted: Re-write/ Encounters, Looking In

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jay-Z and the End of All Religion

Dating back to the founding of our country, the Illuminati conspiracy theory has evolved and changed numerous times throughout American history. It is interesting to note that many of the Illuminati’s theorized incidents have in fact been a direct reflection of the current times. Whether it was the “Red Scare” of the 1950’s, the “Cuban Missile Crisis” of the 1960’s, or in recent years “9-11,” the Illuminati has been used as a gateway of explanation from one generation to the next.

In today’s age the Illuminati conspiracy theory has only grown stronger with the help of the Internet and American media. As a result, the Illuminati conspiracy continues to grow and change each and every day. Currently many conspirators seem to be interested in tying the Illuminati conspiracy with many popular celebrities. In particular the music industry has had a very big impact on many of today’s conspirators.

Celebrities such as Jay-Z, Beyonce, Rihanna, and Lady Gaga, are only a few of the many artists theorized to be a part of the Illuminati. Many websites have actually taken the time to breakdown their songs, music videos, and clothing, in an effort to uncover traces of Illuminati signs and symbols.  One of the Illuminati’s most well known symbols is the “all seeing eye” also shown on the back of the United States’ one dollar bill which is known as the “Eye of Horus.” Over the years many people have claimed that Jay-Z’s record label “Rocafella” along with his clothing line “Rocawear” depicts pictures similar to the “Eye of Horus.”

To validate these claims many conspirators draw upon Jay-Z’s lyrics. For example, lyrics from Jay-Z’s song “Empire State of Mind” contains a verse stating, “Jesus can’t save you, life starts when the church ends.” A major premise of the Illuminati conspiracy is in fact the end of all religion.  Accordingly, many conspirators have concluded Jay-Z is not only a member of the Illuminati but a devil worshiper as well.

In my opinion, conspiracies such as this are again a direct reflection of the times.  According to “The American Religious Data Survey of 2008,” in recent years there has been a major increase in Americans without any religion affiliation. This is why I find it interesting that many modern day Illuminati conspiracies such as the one involving Jay-Z, contains many religious ending undertones.

Be that as it may, religion in America definitely is not what it was in generations past. That is not to say there are no longer any religious Americans, but I do believe it is fair to assert in many parts of the country religion is definitely on the decline.  To me, conspirators are again using the Illuminati as a gateway to explain a change in the times as well as their thinking. The Illuminati conspiracy and the major issues of current America continue to refashion each and every generation. In my opinion this trend still continues to prevail today and will still continue to prevail in future generations to come.

 

 

 


Self Defined

           In 1960, Greensborough North Carolina, a time when facebook and other social media sites were non existent, four black college students sat down at an exclusively white lunch counter in protest of southern segregation laws. When asked to move they refused and as tensions began to grow so did the protest. Eventually a protest of only four led to a movement of thousands across the south. Without the help of social media these “sit ins’’ spread like fever, and in only a month’s time crossed state lines and engulfed the south. Now, had facebook or twitter been around, would things have ended up different? Gladwell would argue yes, as would I, but for different reasons.

            When it comes to activism Gladwell argues in his article “Small Change’’ that social media is nothing but a tool for people to take the easy way out. He asserts that in order to achieve change activism needs to have strong ties, high risk, and a hierarchy within the movement.  I would agree that all of these things are indeed vital to achieve change, but these characteristics are all derived from the mutual efforts of many brave people. What Gladwell neglects to acknowledge is that all mutual effort in any circumstance, is derived from self.  Self is what sparks activism and without a spark your left with no fire.

            In my opinion, had facebook been around in the 60’s, it would have been to the benefit of the Civil Rights Movement. Information would have spread much quicker and would have also raised awareness not only across the south, but the north as well.  Social media may have also lit the spark in those who may have never been brave enough to partake in the Civil Rights Movement.  Although they may have only started out as “weak ties’’, I believe these weak ties would have evolved into something much greater.

            For these reasons is it really logical to think that people would have liked a page that boycotted busses but continued to ride them?  That instead of marching the streets of Birmingham they would have just tweeted?  I understand that facebook is a network of “weak ties’’ but I find it hard to believe it would prevent strong ties from forming. These strong ties Gladwell speaks of develop from self and grow stronger when united with others.  If anything, facebook would have helped unite these individuals, which would have thus lead to the development of strong ties.

            In today’s age social media has played a critical role in uniting ourselves as people, but it hasn’t defined us as individuals. Your facebook or twitter page holds no weight on the actions that defines you as a person. Instead, each of your actions and or opinions you make generate from one thing and one thing only, self. Self is who you are; it defines you. How you live your life, despite the many outside influences, is a direct reflection of self.

            Our strengths, our weaknesses, our fears, our motivation, all originate from self. It is the fuel to any action we as a people have ever taken or will ever take. Self is personal to each and every individual; it distincts one person from the next. It is the reason so many brave people laid down their lives for a cause greater then themselves.

            Whether it’s violence, drugs, or other addictions I think it’s very easy for people to stray away from who they truly are.  However, when people believe in a higher calling worth laying down their life, they will definitely go further then just like a page on facebook. Higher callings come from within and no social media site can deter you away from a feeling so deep and close to your true self. In fact I believe social media is capable of achieving just the opposite; I believe social media is capable of lighting the spark within our true self.

 

 

 


Rewrite: Twisted

                                                       Twisted: Rewrite

            As I was navigating through Word Press in search of something interesting, I must say I was not having very much luck at all. I started out my journey by clicking on ‘‘Ander Monson’’, which led me to a strange page with even more links. Each of the links were connected to a series of red lines, which connected to a mess of black lines at the top and bottom of the page. I thought the page was very oddly set up, definitely something that I had never seen before so I began to click away to see where these red lines would take me.

Everything was poetry related and I very soon realized any site with poetry definitely was not a site for me. It was then I decided to go back to Word Press to see what else I could find. Since Ander Monson was the top name on the list I thought to myself ‘‘maybe I’ll have better luck with the bottom name’’, so I clicked on ‘‘Scott Mcloud’’. Unlike the last site Mcloud’s site was very detailed and had a lot more to offer. I scrolled down the page hoping that something would grab my attention until finally in big red letters I came across the word ‘‘PLAY!’’. Being the great procrastinator I am of course I decided to click on it.

Soon eerie background music started to play as the game began to load. The game was composed of six chapters, each chapter weirder then the next. I hadn’t the slightest clue of what I had just got myself into.  To be honest I had never seen or heard of any such game in my life. There were no rules, no right or wrong way to play it, you just clicked away and a tiny cartoon person with brown hair took care of the rest. Each click brought about different colors, noises, and actions by this strange little man.

Even though there wasn’t much of a point to the game it was still a lot of fun to play. It was then I realized just like in the game, sometimes life doesn’t call for a specific purpose or point at all. Taking risks and trying something new is vital to the process of learning. I believe a certain wisdom is obtained when experiencing the unexpected. Falling down unfamiliar rabbit holes isn’t always a bad thing; sometimes it’s just what we need.

 

 

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.